Agenda

ICTforAg will engage 275 thought leaders and decision makers in agriculture, technology and international development on June 10, 2016.

Friday, June 10th

8:30-9:00am: Registration

  • Light Breakfast and Registration
    Wake up, grab coffee and treats, and find your friends and your seat before the event begins

9:00-10:00am: Opening Session

  • Increasing Farmer Resilience, Using Technology: Dr. Debisi Araba, International Center for Tropical Agriculture.
    Farmers face an array of risk factors, many of which are out of their control. How can we use the tools of technology to increase their resilience, and therefore the food security of their communities and countries at large? Dr. Araba lead the implementation of Nigeria’s National Agricultural Resilience Framework and will share his experiences from the frontlines of ICTforAg efforts.

10:00-10:30am: Enlightening Lightning Talks on Key Trends

  • User-Centered Design Is Crucial, But How to Do It Well? Jacob Korenblum, Souktel
    User-centered design is vital for promoting digital service adoption at scale. However, there’s little consensus on what good user-centered design actually looks like – much is good, bad, and ugly. What are the “how-to” steps for success? Better yet, in fragile states?
  • Engaging Youth with Edutainment: Stephanie Schwartzkopf, DAI
    We might dismiss “edutainment” as not serious education, but it is a proven way to reach young people when relatable characters and a compelling narrative are combined with high-quality video and SMS-driven audience responses. The real question is if it can help young people overcome the emotional and social barriers to starting a business in agriculture?
  • What Does Sustainability Look Like? Alex Dunlop, Digital Green
    Institutionalization is a nasty word to pronounce and is pretty much the least-sexy goal out there, yet we all clamor for (and sometimes claim) sustainability. How can we work with governments to institutionalize our approaches, making them their own after our grant cycles end?
  • Actionable and Scalable: Farmer-Owned Data Management: Karis McGill, Engility
    Producers need to take ownership of and responsibility for data collection, management and analysis for it to be actionable and scalable. Yet how do we achieve this in ICTforAG? What does a farmer-owned data management system look like, and what does it take to be successful?

10:30-11:00am: Morning Break

  • Reconnect with your friends and peers, reflect on the morning’s inspirations and ideas, and visit vendor demonstrations.

11:00am-12:00pm: Morning Plenary

  • How Can ICT Increase Food Security? Christopher Burns, USAID; Hedwig Siewertsen, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa; Stewart Collis, aWhere; Daniele Tricarico, GSMA; Debisi Araba, CIAT; Wayan Vota, FHI 360
    We can now use myriad technologies to predict weather changes that can lead to crop failures, food insecurity, and political unrest. However, much of the response is still one-size-fits-all national policies. How can we leverage new and innovative technologies to create more nuanced interventions that reach smallholder farmers and improve their resilience?

12:00-12:45pm: Learning Lunch Tables and Vendor Demonstrations

Learning Lunch Tables

  • How Can We Use ICT to Excite Youth About Agriculture? Vicki Walker, Winrock
  • Open Data vs. Privacy and Security in ICTforAg: Lindsay Ferris, The Engine Room
  • T4Ag: Walking the Line of Personal Vs Automated: Diane Pueschel, Oxfam America; Mansi Anand, Oxfam America
  • The Opportunity and Challenges of Government Data Accuracy: Clement K. Tay, Ministry of Health, Liberia
  • How Can We Create a Culture of Data Entrepreneurship in Agriculture? Greg Austic, Photosynq
  • What’s the Secret to User Generated Content from Farmers? Shital Shah, Awaaz.De
  • Where is the Missing Resource: Electricity? Sonali Rohatgi, FHI 360, Gabriella Oken Wilbur, Accenture Development Partnerships
  • Cultivating the Value for Ag Investment Data: The Initiative for Open Ag Funding: Taryn Davis, Development Gateway; Laia Griñó, InterAction
  • The Role of WhatsApp, Viber, and Messaging in Ag: Umaru Bah, Morgan State University
  • How Do We Improve Nutrition with Technology? Kyla Stockdale, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition

Vendor Demonstration Tables

  • 6th Grain: Molly E Brown, 6th Grain
    6th Grain uses technology to gather farmer-specific data, unmanned aerial vehicle imagery, state of the art geospatial data products, and weather information to provide a comprehensive suite of products for locally specific decision making with governments and institutions in the developing world.
  • Agrivi: Matija Zulj, Agrivi
    Agrivi builds full-featured farm management software solutions used by thousands of farmers and cooperatives in 150 countries to identify and reduce pest risks, bring farming best practices, achieve maximum yield and improve their overall farm performance.
  • DevResults: Josh Mandell, DevResults
    DevResults is a web application specifically designed to empower international development, grant-making, humanitarian assistance, and disaster relief programs, with tools for managing M&E data, mapping, project management, and collaboration.
  • Fairtrade America: Hans Theyer, FairTrade America
    Fairtrade America is the official US representative of the international Fairtrade certification system, a global network working to increase market access for smallholder farmers and supporting producers to meet environmental, social and economic standards.
  • GeoTraceability: André Siqueira, GeoTraceability
    GeoTraceability specializes in large scale data collection and traceability programs adapted to smallholders in developing and emerging countries. GeoTraceability’s innovative IT solutions and services help build trust and transparency throughout supply chains.
  • smartAVC: Emmanuel Ruvurajabo, Zillionizer
    smartAVC, developed by Zillionizer, digitizes an entire agricultural value chain including digital weighing machines that can automatically trigger digital payment via mobile money or smart cash to farmers when they deliver their products at different collection centers, cooperatives or factories.
  • TaroWorks: Elaine Chang, TaroWorks
    The TaroWorks app provides offline mobile data collection and relationship management, combined with a powerful analytics platform, for managing remote operations and monitoring & evaluation. It is built on the Salesforce platform and accessed in the field via Android devices.
  • VARI: Sai Krishna Dandamudi, VARI
    VARI provides direct communication between buyers and sellers using an online and mobile platform, providing better market information to farmers, improving farmers’ incomes, and delivering better prices to consumers for agricultural produce.

12:45-1:30pm Afternoon Plenary

  • Can Radio, Video and Mobile Encourage Farmer Adoption? An Ethiopian Case Study: Neil Patel, Awaaz.De; Alex Dunlop, Digital Green; Mark Leclair, Farmer Radio International; Judy Payne, USAID
    Farmer adoption is a timeless challenge that’s often bedeviled programs that use a single communications medium to reach farmers. But what if we took a collaborative, multi-modal approach? Could mixing FM radio, Interactive Voice Response, and video be more effective? We’ll learn from an effort in Ethiopia with several technology companies and the Agricultural Transformation Agency.

1:30-2:00pm Inspiring Lightning Talks on New Innovations

  • The Role of ICT in Conflict Zones: Nancy Brown, Abt Associates
    Lessons learned from introducing farmers’ unions to mobiles for agricultural logistics and market prices in South Sudan, where ICT made an impact in—and even on—unstable, violent environments.
  • Low-cost Remote Sensing for Farm Productivity: Sabeen Dhanani, USAID
    The mobile phone revolution has bequeathed a plethora of low-cost sensors we can now use to improve agriculture. Which ones show promise? What can they tell us? And how can we use them to produce better development outcomes?
  • Smarter Value Chain Improvements: Traceability and Transparency: Lana Zaman, Social Impact
    Farmers and processors find it difficult to trace products from start to finish, but achieving traceability is critical to agricultural trade, especially exports. Cooperatives and associations can help, with best practices from Nicaragua, Senegal, and Mozambique dairy and cashew value chains.
  • Crowdsourcing for Evidenced-Based Food Security Assessments: Rhiannan Price, DigitalGlobe
    Unlocking the power of high resolution satellite imagery means taking advantage of innovative approaches like crowdsourcing. Yet how can we crowdsource insights from imagery at scale, and ensure high quality outputs? Especially in fragile states like South Sudan?
  • Innovating Voice Outreach with Call Center Technology: Daniel Asare-Kyei, Esoko
    Voice is a powerful tool for farmer education, and when combined with modern call center technology and practices, it can change the way farmers access agriculture and nutrition information. Call centers can also link farmers to vital social protection services, increasing their overall resilience.

2:00-2:15pm Session Transfers

  • Reflect on the keynote and lightning talk, reconnect with your peers, and choose your next experience

2:15-3:15pm Early Afternoon Breakout Sessions

  • What Works for Ag Data: Apps, Tools, and Visualizations: Alethea Josephson, Vera Solutions; Matthew Cooper, Conservation International; Michael Shoag, Forum One
    There are hundreds of cloud and mobile applications on the market promising to help organizations working in agriculture improve and simplify data management, collection, visualization, and analysis. But how do you choose the best application for your needs? And how can you best implement and maintain such a system?
  • How to Work with Mobile Operators and VAS Vendors to Scale mAgri: Daniele Tricarico, GSMA; Kristen Roggemann, DAI
    Understanding the perspective of mobile operators and Value Added Service providers is critical to ensure that mobile agriculture projects have the best opportunity to scale and generate positive socioeconomic impact. How can you build effective partnerships with ICT players? What are the opportunities for collaboration?
  • What Can mAg Learn from mHealth? Pamela Riley, Abt Associates; Emily Mangone, Abt Associates; David McAfee, HNI; Carolyn Florey, DIAL
    mHealth and mAg share challenges (low literacy, connectivity gaps, funding) and technology trends (mobile payments, data visualization, big data), but rarely is there communication or partnership across sectors. What lessons transcend silos and can improve impact of both?
  • Can Digital Solutions Reduce Counterfeit Agriculture Inputs? Judy Payne, USAID; Betsy Ness-Edelstein, Abt Associates; Jennifer Peterson, Tetra Tech/ARD
    There is a huge counterfeiting problem with agricultural inputs like seeds and pesticides, and Uganda is tackling this challenge with digitally-enabled solutions. Yet the solutions are not simple to implement or scale, and counterfeiters are clever. What can we learn from Uganda’s experience, and how to apply it to other countries?
  • The Promise and Pitfalls of Digital Financial Services: Carrie Hasselback, FHI 360; Nikki Brand, USAID; Katherine McKee, CGAP; Rewa Misra, The MasterCard Foundation
    Banks and mobile network operators are working together and separately to expand financial services to farmers, but who is doing it right and what can we learn from them? Also, what lessons can we learn about what not to do as we experiment with technology, data, support, and pricing of DFS solutions for the ag sector?
  • What Works: High Tech, Low Tech, or No Tech? Hillary Proctor, Making Cents International; Adam Wolf, Arable Labs; Hubert Peri, Root Capital
    We often get excited by the shiny-flashy new technology toy, and sometimes that’s exactly what’s needed. Other times, low-tech approaches are more sustainable, and no-tech efforts could work the best. How to know when to use each approach though, and what are the trade-offs?

3:15-3:30pm Session Transfers

  • Reflect on the previous sessions, reconnect with your peers, and choose your next experience

3:30-4:30pm Mid-Afternoon Breakout Sessions

  • Big Data for Smart Agriculture: Luda Bujoreanu, World Bank; Alejandro Solis, DAI; Stewart Collis, aWhere; Daniel Jimenez, CIAT; Debisi Araba, CIAT
    There is much hype around the use of Big Data and analytics to provide actors in the farmer ecosystem with greater access to timely and relevant information. But what is the reality of practitioners in Columbia, Nigeria and Uruguay? How have they used Big Data for evidence-based decision making and more efficient agriculture management?
  • How Do You Know Your Intervention is Working? Ben Jaques-Leslie, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab; Alex Dunlop, Digital Green; David Spielman, IFPRI
    Donor-required M&E reports are one thing, but real external evaluations are great way to validate your approach and impact. Collaborating with a research partner can generate learning and improve your work. What are the options? What can I learn from evaluations of other programs if I can’t afford my own?
  • Satellite Imagery and Remote Sensing: Myths, Realities and Opportunities: Rhiannan Price, DigitalGlobe; Trevor Monroe, World Bank; Adam Wolf, Arable Labs
    The allure of satellite imagery is easy to see, yet there are limitations and lessons learned from ground-truthing its results. From delineating field boundaries to crop health and yield estimation – what can you trust, what should you verify, and when is it best to use another technology altogether?
  • The Secrets to Social and Behavior Change Communications: Aaron Sundsmo, Plan International; Melissa Persaud, VOTO Mobile; Mark Leclair, Farm Radio International; Shadi Azadegan, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)
    There are many ICT tools we can use for SBCC, but how do we ensure their effectiveness? How can we leverage combined multimodal approaches to increase impact? What are the inclusive participatory solutions that guide more value chain stakeholders through the stages of social change?
  • ICT for Smart Agricultural Markets and Value Chains: Geetha Nagarajan, Social Impact; Eleanor Morefield, USDA-FAS; Sarah Islam, Social Impact
    How can ICT expand agricultural trade within developing countries, and across borders? How can we support such efforts? What are successful examples from the field? What is the role of private-public partnerships and market linkages?

4:30-5:00pm: Closing Session

  • Trends for Tomorrow: Daniel Jimenez, International Center for Tropical Agriculture
    Today, most farmers use experience and intuition to make key decisions, but the data revolution is coming and soon we’ll see even the poorest smallholder accessing the best information for them, right in their fields thanks to remote sensors, Big Data, and machine learning applied to everything from weather patterns to seed qualities.

5:00-7:00pm: Conference Reception & Hands-On Demos

  • International Agriculture Week Happy Hour Reception
    Join over 300 of your peers in agriculture, technology, and development at a very special reception. We will be celebrating International Agriculture Week Reception with the AIARD 52nd Annual Conference and hands-on demos of cool technology, drink in hand.

Vendor Demonstration Tables

  • 6th Grain: Molly E Brown, 6th Grain
    6th Grain uses technology to gather farmer-specific data, unmanned aerial vehicle imagery, state of the art geospatial data products, and weather information to provide a comprehensive suite of products for locally specific decision making with governments and institutions in the developing world.
  • Agrivi: Matija Zulj, Agrivi
    Agrivi builds full-featured farm management software solutions used by thousands of farmers and cooperatives in 150 countries to identify and reduce pest risks, bring farming best practices, achieve maximum yield and improve their overall farm performance.
  • DevResults: Josh Mandell, DevResults
    DevResults is a web application specifically designed to empower international development, grant-making, humanitarian assistance, and disaster relief programs, with tools for managing M&E data, mapping, project management, and collaboration.
  • Fairtrade America: Hans Theyer, FairTrade America
    Fairtrade America is the official US representative of the international Fairtrade certification system, a global network working to increase market access for smallholder farmers and supporting producers to meet environmental, social and economic standards.
  • GeoTraceability: André Siqueira, GeoTraceability
    GeoTraceability specializes in large scale data collection and traceability programs adapted to smallholders in developing and emerging countries. GeoTraceability’s innovative IT solutions and services help build trust and transparency throughout supply chains.
  • smartAVC: Emmanuel Ruvurajabo, Zillionizer
    smartAVC, developed by Zillionizer, digitizes an entire agricultural value chain including digital weighing machines that can automatically trigger digital payment via mobile money or smart cash to farmers when they deliver their products at different collection centers, cooperatives or factories.
  • TaroWorks: Elaine Chang, TaroWorks
    The TaroWorks app provides offline mobile data collection and relationship management, combined with a powerful analytics platform, for managing remote operations and monitoring & evaluation. It is built on the Salesforce platform and accessed in the field via Android devices.
  • VARI: Sai Krishna Dandamudi, VARI
    VARI provides direct communication between buyers and sellers using an online and mobile platform, providing better market information to farmers, improving farmers’ incomes, and delivering better prices to consumers for agricultural produce.